Tuesday, May 17, 2011

June 26th set as celebration of "Faith Shared"

PASTORS TO HOST READINGS FROM THE QUR’AN AT CHURCHES ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO DISPLAY RESPECT AND COMBAT ANTI-MUSLIM BIGOTRY

The National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. along with 50 churches in 26 states have already joined the effort

Washington, D.C. – Christian clergy at churches across the country will host readings from the Qur’an and other sacred religious texts as they welcome their Muslim and Jewish colleagues on Sunday, June 26, 2011 for Faith Shared: Uniting in Prayer and Understanding. Faith Shared is a project of Interfaith Alliance and Human Rights First, which seeks to send a message both here at home and to the Arab and Muslim world about our respect for Islam. The National Cathedral in Washington, DC, along with 50 churches in 26 states have committed to participating in this effort. Other participating churches include Christ Church in New York City and All Saints Church in Pasadena, Calif. A full list of participating houses of worship can be found at faithshared.org.

Faith Shared seeks to counter the Anti-Muslim bigotry and negative stereotypes that have erupted throughout the country in the past year and led to misconceptions, distrust and in some cases, violence. This countrywide, day-long event will engage faith leaders on the national and community levels in a conversation with their houses of worship, highlighting respect among people of different faiths. This event will help counter the common misperception abroad that most Americans are hostile to Islam. It will send a message that Americans respect Muslims and Islam, as they respect religious differences and freedom of religion in general.

Faith Shared is designed to reflect the mutual respect shared among so many Muslims, Christians, Jews and other Americans, as they stand together to oppose the negative images that have dominated domestic and international news.

“The anti-Muslim rhetoric that has pervaded our national conversation recently has shocked and saddened me,” said Interfaith Alliance President Rev. Dr. C. Welton Gaddy. “Appreciation for pluralism and respect for religious freedom and other human rights are at the core of our democracy. We believe that demonstrating our commitment to those core American values will help counteract the intensified level of negative stereotypes and anti-Muslim bigotry in our recent public discourse.

“With Faith Shared, congregations will send a clear message to the world that Americans respect religious differences and reject bigotry and the demonization of Islam or any other religion,” said Human Rights First’s Tad Stahnke. “This message about the fundamental importance of religious freedom around the world is especially timely as President Obama prepares to reaffirm the United States’ support for democracy in the Middle East starting with a speech later this week.”

“Few things are more important for the future of our world than to respect, to honor, and to commit ourselves to the well-being of every person—to embrace a sense of humility before the vast mystery of God,” said National Cathedral Dean Sam Lloyd. “As Americans and as people of faith, we must use our great traditions to come together for mutual enrichment and understanding.”

At its core, this project will bring together Christian, Jewish and Muslim clergy to read from and hear from each other’s sacred texts. In doing so, they will serve as a model for respect and cooperation and create a concrete opportunity to build and strengthen working ties between and among faith communities moving forward.

For more information on this project, visit the Faith Shared website.

10 comments:

LGMarshall said...

Christianity is based on faith that Jesus is God, and died on the Cross so that those who believe in Him may live.

Jews [except Messianic] say Jesus was a blasphemer, a liar, a fraud at best.

Muslims say Jesus is not God, he is not the Son of God and he was not crucified.

Wondering what is meant by 'Shared Faith'? Please explain.

SUSAN RUSSELL said...

I can't decide if I'm more offended by your entitled presumption to define Christianity for Christendom or by your blanket ignorance about other faith traditions.

Either way, too busy today to "explain" shared faith. Maybe somebody else can take a crack at it.

Or not.

uffda51 said...

Not.

Tragically, LG's perspective is shared by far too many members of Congress and far too many possible presidential candidates.

robert said...

so then I can assume that there will be readings from the Torah and the Bible at mosques around the country. and we will pressure the various tolerant and accepting governments of Islamic countries to, oh I don't know, maybe stop burning any bible brought into the country or maybe stop burning Christian churches. No? I didn't think so.

SUSAN RUSSELL said...

I'm filing this one under "light a candle vs. cursing the darkness." Be cynical if you want ... focusing on shared faith rather than polarizing polemic works for me.

Tracy said...

Do you believe the Holy Bible to be the God-breathed, God inspired, inerrant word of God? The word of God says, "Who is a liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? He is antichrist who denies the Father and the Son. Whoever denies the Son does not have the Father either; he who acknowledges the Son has the Father also. 1 John 2:22-23. My question is, isn't it dangerous to accept and bring into our churches a religion that so vehemently denies the deity of Jesus Christ and His relationship with the Father? Your thoughts?

Tracy said...

Tracy said...
Do you believe the Holy Bible to be the God-breathed, God inspired, inerrant word of God? The word of God says, "Who is a liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? He is antichrist who denies the Father and the Son. Whoever denies the Son does not have the Father either; he who acknowledges the Son has the Father also. 1 John 2:22-23. My question is, isn't it dangerous to accept and bring into our churches a religion that so vehemently denies the deity of Jesus Christ and His relationship with the Father? Your thoughts?

SUSAN RUSSELL said...

No. No I don't believe that about the Bible. And right know I'm knee deep in my Trinity Sunday sermon so that will have to be it for now.

Tracy said...

Tracy said...
Would you mind commenting on that when you have some time? I'm curious to see what your opinion is about that. Sorry to bother you. Have a good night.

Joseph said...

If you read the Bible or the Torah in a Mosque in my country India, or any Mosque in a Muslim country, you will be simply LYNCHED.

Joseph