Monday, February 04, 2008

Happy Super Monday!

So if yesterday was SUPER Bowl Sunday and tomorrow is SUPER Tuesday (work with me here ...) shouldn't today be:


SUPER MONDAY!!!
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Of course it should! So here's wishing all ya'll a "super Monday" ... and here are some Super Monday shout outs to some super blog bits & pieces:
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Integrity Fort Worth has launched a new blog ... leading today with this Chicago Tribune feature on just-consecrated-on-Saturday Bishop Jeffrey Lee that includes this snippet:

Wrapping up a five-day tour in honor of Jeffrey Lee, the new Chicago bishop, Katharine Jefferts Schori declared that the American church will not stand alone in its support of gay clergy during an international meeting in July in Lambeth, England.
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"Many more [bishops] than you might expect are sympathetic," Jefferts Schori, the presiding Episcopal bishop, told parishioners at St. Nicholas Church in Elk Grove Village. "They are not, however, the loudest voices."
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Later in Chicago, Lee was seated at St. James Cathedral and reminded audience members of their call to ministry by virtue of their baptism, not their liberal or conservative interpretations of Scripture."
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That's one of the tragedies afflicting the church right now," he said. "So many of us seem to think that salvation depends on our theological correctness."
And let's get a big Super Monday AMEN to that!
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"In other news," Episcopal Cafe is reporting that the Archbishop of Canterbury is utilizing Facebook as a means to call the faithful to a Holy Lent. Now that's an interesting approach! Good for him!
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And here at All Saints yesterday Ed Bacon preached a kick-butt sermon ... "Obeying Our Inner Voice" ... a great way to end Epiphany and head into Lent.
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So wherever you're headed today, make it a Super Monday ... and stay tuned for Super Tuesday ... coming soon to a blog near you!!
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6 comments:

RonF said...

By the way, after having been to Bp. Jeffrey Dean Lee's consecration, I have a point of order to raise:

I understand the need for gluten-free bread at such functions. However, it should be recognized that a bread that is gluten-free has certain mechanical limitations. I would suggest that either some kind of separate gluten-free line be designated, the practice of intinction be banned, or (easiest to implement) separate intinction vessels be provided. It's disconcerting (to say the least) and a choking hazard (at the worst) to partake of the Blood of Christ and get a rather large floatie in your mouth.

RonF said...

It certainly interferes with the spirituality of the moment.

RonF said...

By the way, after having been to Bp. Jeffrey Dean Lee's consecration, I have a point of order to raise:

I understand the need for gluten-free bread at such functions. However, it should be recognized that a bread that is gluten-free has certain mechanical limitations. I would suggest that either some kind of separate gluten-free line be designated, the practice of intinction be banned, or (easiest to implement) separate intinction vessels be provided. It's disconcerting (to say the least) and a choking hazard (at the worst) to partake of the Blood of Christ and get a rather large floatie in your mouth.

Jim said...

Ronf,

Sue-z, as you may know, is celiac -- in fact we had two celiac from just our congregation at the service of consecration. A milligram of wheat in the wine will make them ill, a gram could land them in real trouble. We are talking a toxin here, no amount of alcohol will stop the damage.

We were thrilled to see the all-gluten free communion. And we are hoping that it will catch on!

Intinction should be banned -- contamination from gluten / wheat is dangerous, crumbs are untidy, and it simply is not a good idea.

FWIW
jimB

Mark said...

Well, banning intinction is certainly one way to throw me out. I'm not going to be refused reception in both kinds and, as an alcoholic, I much prefer not to take a huge gulp of wine.

RonF said...

My priest agrees with you. He's tempted strongly to ban it in our parish. He quotes studies that say that you get more germs in the wine and on the vessel from people's hands than from their mouths.

I can believe it. But perception does not always track reality. If I come up to the Communion rail and I've been coughing through half the service (and pounding down cough syrup and drops - I'm our only tenor), practically speaking I have to either intinct or forgo the species altogether or other people are going to end up with what they will consider an unpleasant choice. My old parish back in the '60's and '70's served the Eucharist using two vessels; one normal-sized chalice, and one mini-chalice that held about a shot-glass full of wine. That's what people used for intinction. In fact, I was surprised when I didn't see that in my present parish when I first started attending. I don't see why that practice can't be adopted. Of course, that's up to my priest.