Sunday, August 07, 2022

A Sermon for Proper 14C: Of Treasure Hunts and Vin Scully and 20 Years of Claiming the Blessing



I bid your indulgence this morning by beginning with this favorite prayer of mine.*

·      God of the stand-up triple, the backdoor slider, the stolen base and the 3-6-3, we thank you for the ordered enchantments of the game of baseball.

·      For the snap of a split-finger fastball in a catcher’s mitt and the arc of a white ball against a blue sky, we praise you.

·      For the green of the grass and the throat of the crowd, we glorify you.

·      For the grace and grit, the speed and strength, the skill and savvy of those who take the field, we give you thanks.

·      Shower your blessings like so many free agent contracts upon those who play, those who coach and those who cheer.

·      Exalt with us when we knock in the winning run, comfort us when we muff an easy grounder, befriend us when the hour is late and the game on the radio is our only company. 

·      Creator God, teach us to play fair; to cheer excellence whomever exhibits it, and to root for teams worthy of our affections. And keep us ever mindful that no matter what the umpire says, in your love, we are always safe at home. Amen.

I grew up on baseball. My dad was a lifelong Dodger fan who believed it was an outward and visible sign of the inherent goodness of the universe that the Dodgers moved to L.A. after he came west from New York looking for work during the Great Depression. The voice of Vin Scully was literally the soundtrack of every summer of my life until he retired – after 67 years of broadcasting the ups and downs of the Boys in Blue. And I know from the outpouring of responses to his death this week at the age of 94 that my story is the story of countless others for whom Vinnie was not just a voice on the radio but a friend and a companion on the journey – not just through the baseball season but through life.

In reflecting on his life this week I have found myself bumping up against all kinds of bits and pieces of my own life. Fond memories of listening with my daddy on the patio in Eagle Rock on hot summer nights to games on the radio. Of sitting in the stadium where the sound of Scully’s voice hovered over the crowd from the hundreds of transistor radios tuned in to his play-by-play.

Of the night Sandy Koufax pitched his perfect game against the Cubs in 1965 … yes I was there! I was nine. Do the math.

And all of those memories transcend the context of a particular game or team or stadium or sportscaster. Rather they are about remembering and celebrating the relationship at the center of those memories. Not only with my dad but with others I’ve shared the joy of victory and the agony of defeat as a lifelong Dodger fan.

Yes, baseball is great. And I give thanks for it. But even more so, I give thanks for the memories of the relationships that have sustained and shaped me – relationships which moments like this week’s collective grief over the passing of Vin Scully has surfaced and given me the chance to ponder in my heart.

And as I mulled the lessons appointed for this Sunday, these words from Jesus’ teaching in the Gospel According to Luke are the ones that jumped out at me:

“Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”

Jesus tells his followers to get rid of their stuff – empty out the Public Storage locker of all the gizmos and whatnots they weren’t using but couldn’t bear to part with – and store up a different kind of treasure: the kind thieves cannot steal, and moths cannot destroy.

“Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”

What I wonder this morning is if the history of the church -- ostensibly founded to follow Jesus and live out his teachings in the world -- has not spent the last 2000+ years on a kind of treasure hunt trying to figure out what that treasure is and therefore where its heart is.

And whether it’s more breaking secular news of the rise of Christian Nationalism in our nation -- or more breaking church news about bishops behaving badly by turning the lives and vocations of God’s beloved LGBTQ people into bargaining chips in the game of global Anglican politics -- we don’t have to look far to see how far we are from bringing that kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven we pray for every time we gather.

And – listening to the words from the prophet Isaiah this morning – it seems we have plenty of company from our spiritual ancestors who were evidently blowing the treasure hunt thing, too.

“These interminable sacrifices of yours: what are they to me?” … Do not bring any more of your useless offerings to me — their incense fills me with loathing. New moons, Sabbaths, assemblies — I cannot endure another festival of injustice! 

“I cannot endure another festival of injustice.”

Maybe it’s just me, but the fact that this particular lesson is appointed for this particular Sunday -- which just happens to be the final day of the Lambeth Conference of Anglican Bishops -- struck me as a rather remarkable coincidence: and that is not to say some good things did not happen across the pond … I’ll get to those in a minute.

But to get back to Isaiah – here is what the prophet proclaimed trying to get them back on the hunt for the treasure God would have them both find and share:

Cease to do evil and learn to do good!
Search for justice and help the oppressed!
Protect those who are orphaned
and plead the case of those who are widowed!
Come now!  Look at the choices before you!


The choice before them was between focusing on their rituals and gatherings and incense and sacrifices or focusing on their relationships with those in need: leveraging their power to protect the orphaned and plead the case of the widowed.

This is the same treasure hunt Jesus called his followers throughout his entire ministry. From the first sermon he preached in Nazareth – which riled up the hometown crowd so much he almost got tossed off a cliff – to his final words in Jerusalem which led to his death and – ultimately to his resurrection.

The treasure map is this simple:

Love God and Love your neighbor as yourself.
On these two hang all the law and the prophets
.

All the law and the prophets.
All the rituals and sacrifices and assemblies and festivals.
All the liturgies and cantatas and prayer book revisions and fights over inclusive language.
All the General Conventions and Lambeth Conferences of Anglican Bishops.

It all hangs on love – love lived out in relationship with God and in relationship with our neighbor.

All our neighbors. Not just the ones who live in our zip code or drive in our carpool or put the same yard signs out on their lawns.

All the law and the prophets.
All your neighbors.

Now this may feel like a non sequitur, but work with me.
I’ll bring it back. I promise.

Twenty years on last Monday, August 1st I arrived here at All Saints Church with a milk crate full of file folders to set up camp in the southeast cubicle in the "temporary trailer."

My title was Executive Director of Claiming the Blessing and my job description work for the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in Body of Christ in general and in the Episcopal Church in specific -- by healing the rift between sexuality and spirituality.

I know. Right?? Nothing ventured, nothing gained!

Well, clearly that work is not done yet. There are miles to go before we rest and there have been countless two steps forward and one step back in the last 20 years.

But we are inarguably in a different place on the journey than we were when the sidewalks outside 132 Euclid were frequently lined with megaphone carrying protestors, when the blessing of a same-sex union or the ordination of a gay or lesbian priest was front page news, and when the Episcopal Church was under threat of being voted off the Anglican Island for consecrating the first openly gay bishop. (Emphasis on the “openly.”)

Yes, we organized and strategized,
legislated and lobbied,
fundraised and focus grouped,
prayed, studied, and then prayed some more.

And yet overarching all the work we did were these values we held to throughout the struggle:

That we never threatened to leave if we didn’t get our own way; 
we only threatened to stay and continue to speak the truth that until there are no strangers left at the gate none of us are truly welcome.

That we called the church to focus on who will come if we include all – not who might leave if we refuse to exclude some.

And that the love that unites us in relationship as members of the Body of Christ iis greater than the differences that challenge us.

Which brings me back to the treasure hunt metaphor and my wondering this morning if the treasure at the heart of our Anglican tradition might just be its ability to value relationship over agreement. 

As Anglicans our DNA was, after all, forged out of the English Reformation by spiritual ancestors who found a way where there was no way to become a particular people of faith who were willing to live with the tension of being both catholic and protestant – rather than keep burning each other at the stake over who was right about which dogma or which doctrine.

We continue on that seeking the treasure of relationship over agreement  at every level of the Episcopal Church –
from our bishops gathered at Lambeth
to our recently completed General Convention
to our work here in the Diocese of Los Angeles
to our mission and ministry here at All Saint Church in Pasadena. 

Nobody ever said it would be easy – but if we continue to set our hearts on relationship … with God and with each other … then we will indeed have the treasure that thieves cannot steal nor moths destroy.

A publication called The Anglican Digest used to have a feature entitled "Makes the Heart Glad." Here's what made my heart this week: this quote from the Archbishop of York addressing the Lambeth Conference of Bishops:

“Now we are no longer threatening to leave, we are threatening to stay. This week is a new beginning for the Anglican Communion, a new beginning of discipleship.”

It makes my heart glad because hope springs eternal and I believe it may truly be a watershed moment.

I am daring to hope that we have arrived at the point where we can live into the DNA of our Anglican Comprehensiveness and move beyond the decades of pitched battles over the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the work and witness of the church as we focus on our common call to discipleship: to telling the Good News of God's inclusive love to this beautiful and broken world in desperate need of it.

I’m not naïve enough to think that we have “arrived at destination” … but I am old enough to know that we are a way piece further down the road than we were when we set up shop in the “temporary trailer” 20 years ago this week – and that is something to rejoice and be glad in.

And so we continue on the treasure hunt – for that is where our heart is.

And as we journey together in God’s future, our job post-Lambeth will be to continue to do what we've been doing. 

To insist that nothing less than full inclusion is good enough for Jesus or for us.

To leverage our privilege to stand up and speak out for those LGBTQ siblings whose voices have been silenced by oppression and marginalization.

To continue to build relationship across difference and trust that the Holy Spirit not only can but will use those relationships to change not only hearts and minds but theologies and policies until there are no strangers left at the gate; until there is no treasure left to hunt; until no matter what any umpire says, every single member of our Big Fat Human Family will know that in God’s love, they are always safe at home. Amen.

================
Preached on Sunday, August 7, 2022 at All Saints Church, Pasadena by the Reverend Canon Susan Russell

* [adapted from Jim Naughton's Opening Day Prayer, 2019]

Friday, August 05, 2022

The Power of Threatening to Stay


The Anglican Digest used to have a feature entitled "Makes the Heart Glad." Here's what makes my heart glad today: Friend Craig Loya, Bishop of Minnesota, posting this picture from the waning days of the Lambeth Conference with this quote:
“Now we are no longer threatening to leave, we are threatening to stay. This week is a new beginning for the Anglican Communion, a new beginning of discipleship.”             -  Archbishop of York Stephen Cottrell, Lambeth Conference 2022

It makes my heart glad because believe it really is a watershed moment for our Big Fat Anglican Family if we truly have arrived at the point where we can live into the DNA of our Anglican Comprehensiveness and move beyond the decades of pitched battles over the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the work and witness of the church and focus on our common call to discipleship: to telling the Good News of God's inclusive love in this beautiful and broken world.

And maybe -- just maybe -- we've managed to get there.

As I said in a tweet yesterday "Justin Welby appears be getting blasted equally by the "he's a homo-loving heretic making sheep eat with wolves" set and the "how dare you not fix 2000 years of misogynistic homophobia in a two week conference" crowd -- meaning he probably got it about right."

And our job post-Lambeth will be to continue to do what we've been doing. To insist that nothing less than full inclusion is good enough for Jesus or for us. To leverage our privilege to stand up and speak out for those LGBTQ siblings whose voices have been silenced by oppression and marginalization. To continue to build relationship across difference and trust that the Holy Spirit not only can but will use those relationships to change hearts and minds as well as theologies and policies.

It's nothing less than the Gospel of Margaret Mead in action: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has."

The actions across the pond -- including the quote from Archbishop Cottrell today -- remind me to give thanks for how far we've come even as we redouble our efforts to keep moving forward. For a window into that journey we've been on, check out this quote from a 2009 NPR interview (which is miraculously still available online) where someone named Susan Russell said:
"LGBT members of the Episcopal Church have never threatened to leave if we don't get our way. Instead we want to focus on who will come if we include all  -- not who might leave if we refuse to exclude some."
And here we are.

https://www.npr.org/2009/07/10/106461260/should-gays-serve-in-the-episcopal-church

Tuesday, August 02, 2022

"We are a Communion of Churches, not a single church" -- Thus Spake the Archbishop of Canterbury

So it was evening and it was morning and it was the Seventh Day of the 2022 Lambeth Conference of Anglican Bishops. And rather than resting on the seventh day -- which actually has a nice biblical precedent -- the bishops dug in for the long awaited discussion on the Lambeth Call entitled "Human Dignity."

And as I "process" the events across the pond in Lambeth Conference Land today, I once again find myself recalling the words of our All Saints Church, Pasadena Rector Emeritus George Regas who called us to "set audacious goals and to celebrate incremental victories."

As a Lambeth Conference observer (1998) and survivor (2008) I believe that the comments posted below from the Archbishop of Canterbury are inarguably an incremental victory over the days of moratoria and threats to vote whole provinces off the Anglican Island for striving to fully include LGBTQ people in the Body of Christ. And for that I rejoice and celebrate.

At the same time, I am working here to balance my gratitude to Justin Welby for not throwing LGBTQ people under the Lambeth Conference bus with my anguish at the damage continuing to be done to LGBTQ people in the name of the Church. The fact that we're better than we were is not good enough as we continue to work toward that audacious goal of being a community of faith where all are welcome, loved and included -- not in spite of who they are but because of who they are. 

Nevertheless, we persist. And today I give thanks for all who have persisted and insisted; advocated and agitated; prayed, lobbied and organized to reach the point where these words could come out of the mouth of the Archbishop of Canterbury ... words I could literally not have imagined when we stood on the fringes of the University of Kent in the summer of 2008 with the Bishop of New Hampshire who had been locked out of the Lambeth Conference.

Of the provinces that are in the minority on the full inclusion of LGBTQI+ people in the life of the church and the world, he said: 
“They have not arrived lightly at their ideas that traditional teaching needs to change. They are not careless about scripture. They do not reject Christ. But they have come to a different view on sexuality after long prayer, deep study and reflection on understandings of human nature. For them, to question this different teaching is unthinkable, and in many countries is making the church a victim of derision, contempt and even attack. For these churches not to change traditional teaching challenges their very existence.”

“I neither have, nor do I seek, the authority to discipline or exclude a church of the Anglican Communion. I will not do so. I may comment in public on occasions, but that is all. We are a Communion of Churches, not a single church."
It's not the whole enchilada ... but it has enough guacamole for me to give thanks for today for the steps forward -- and to regroup and recharge for the ongoing work ahead. La lucha continua. 

Tuesday, July 26, 2022

Canterbury Inches Toward Making Communion Across Difference An Actual Thing

On July 18th as hundreds of Anglican bishops were making their way to the postponed-from-2018 Lambeth Conference 2022, the news broke that buried in the conference materials in their inboxes -- in the section ironically entitled "Human Dignity" -- was a reaffirmation of the portion of Lambeth 1998 Resolution 1.10 stating that “it is the mind of the Anglican Communion as a whole that same-gender marriage is not permissible.” Furthermore, participants were informed they would be expected to use electronic voting devices to either agree to adopt or adapt the motion -- voting "no" was not an option. 

The reaction was swift and -- to those of us who have been advocating for the full inclusion all the baptized in the Body of Christ for decades -- gratifying. Bishop after bishop issued strong statements condemning the process in general and the content in particular. The TEC LGBTQ Caucus launched a webpage tracking the statements.

I wrote an "Open Letter to Archbishop Justin Welby -- suggesting this edit to solve the problem: 


And then -- against all odds and the expectations of most veteran Anglican Communion Watchers -- things began to change. 

On July 25, an initial response from Lambeth Conference added the option of "I do not add my voice to this Call" to the voting process -- with a promise of updated content to come.

On July 26, that updated content was posted including this edit to the original Lambeth Call to Human Dignity 2.3 posted above:
Prejudice on the basis of gender or sexuality threatens human dignity. Given Anglican polity, and especially the autonomy of Provinces, there is disagreement and a plurality of views on the relationship between human dignity and human sexuality. Yet, we experience the safeguarding of dignity in deepening dialogue. It is the mind of the Anglican Communion as a whole that “all baptised, believing and faithful persons, regardless of sexual orientation are full members of the Body of Christ” and to be welcomed, cared for, and treated with respect (I.10, 1998). Many Provinces continue to affirm that same gender marriage is not permissible. Lambeth Resolution I.10 (1998) states that the “legitimizing or blessing of same sex unions” cannot be advised. Other Provinces have blessed and welcomed same sex union/marriage after careful theological reflection and a process of reception. As Bishops we remain committed to listening and walking together to the maximum possible degree, despite our deep disagreement on these issues.
Just take that in for a minute.

We've gone from "not permissible" -- utterly ignoring the irrefutable data point that in many places in the Anglican Communion such marriages are not just permitted but celebrated -- to:
Many Provinces continue to affirm that same gender marriage is not permissible. Lambeth Resolution I.10 (1998) states that the “legitimizing or blessing of same sex unions” cannot be advised. Other Provinces have blessed and welcomed same sex union/marriage after careful theological reflection and a process of reception. As Bishops we remain committed to listening and walking together to the maximum possible degree, despite our deep disagreement on these issues.
As Bishop Bonnie Perry wrote from Canterbury: "I find this statement to be descriptive and not prescriptive and an accurate representation of the varied positions on same sex marriage and blessings in the Anglican Communion."

This, my friends, is what Communion Across Difference is all about. Acknowledging our differences. Being honest about who we are and what we believe. And committing to walk together -- to the maximum possible degree -- anyway. 

This is what it means to have the DNA of Anglican Comprehensiveness coursing in our veins. It is what it means to be the spiritual descendants of those who refused to settle for the binary choice of being either Protestant or Catholic but to end the cycle of burning each other at the stake by choosing instead to live together in the tension of each thinking the other is wrong.

And this is what we have to bring as Good News to this beautiful and broken world wracked by polarization, division and zero-sum-game calculations: a vision for how bridges can be built across seemingly intractable differences in order to combine forces to address the challenges that call us to unite as members of the same human family.

Now, I don't know what will happen next at Lambeth. The bishops have not yet even begun their work together and many of them are -- as I write this -- still traveling, gathering, napping and looking for lost luggage (from what I can see on social media.) But whatever happens next -- or finally -- what happened today is a sign of both hope and possibility. And I'm grateful to sit for a moment and rejoice and be glad in it

  

Saturday, July 23, 2022

"Mind the Gap" -- Reprising a Lambeth 2008 sermon on the Eve of Lambeth 2022

In 2008 I had the privilege of preaching at the Eucharist held on the fringe of the Lambeth Conference of Anglican Bishops. It was sponsored by the Inclusive Communion cohort who had come to witness to God's inclusive love in the face of the toxic systemic homophobia which infects the Anglican Communion in general and the Church of England in particular.

Thinking about what to say on the Eve of Lambeth 2022 I can't come up with better words than these ... so here they are again:

"Mind the gap" is something we've heard a lot since we've been here in England … and I can’t help but wonder if minding the gap isn’t one of the ways an island people cope with the challenges of gaps that don’t have anything to do with trains or platforms.

It is a mindset that says “gaps happen and we mind them and keep moving along” that is part of the DNA of not only the English people but of the English Church.

It is the essence of an Anglican comprehensiveness that has – up until now – been able to hold together a world-wide communion in spite of the gaps between theologies and polities and languages and liturgies.As this Lambeth Conference begins, I’m wondering if “minding the gap” might not be one of the most important things those of us who love, care about and pray for this Anglican Communion can do.In John 8:32, Jesus promised that “the truth will set you free.” To mind the gap is to commit ourselves to tell the truth about the very real gaps that exist between the experiences, worldviews, and theologies of many members of the Anglican Communion. It is equally to speak the truth that the Gospel we share is stronger than the differences we acknowledge.

And to claim the truth that the church -- at its best -- has not only the potential but the vocation to bridge not only the gaps that separate us from each other within the communion but the gaps that separate the church from the world it has been created to serve as the Body of Christ … as Jesus’ hands and feet at work in the world.
When Jesus said “inasmuch as you did it unto the least of these” the question he asked was “did you bring water to the thirsty, food to the hungry, clothing to the naked?” … not “did you agree on liturgical practice, come to consensus on a biblical hermeneutic, unravel the mystery of human sexuality?”And it is the opportunity to witness to that truth that will set this church – this communion – indeed this creation – free of the fear of inclusion and open to the Holy Spirit of God calling it to move forward in faith into God’s future.As our bishops gather for this Lambeth Conference, our prayer for them is that the God who has given them the will to do these things give them the grace and power to accomplish them. And our prayer for all of us is that we may go and do likewise. Amen

Thursday, July 21, 2022

Open letter to Archbishop Justin Welby on Fixing "Bait & Switch Lambeth*"

Your Grace, 

As a veteran Lambeth watcher, I have been watching the plans for the upcoming Lambeth Conference 2022 unfold. It has been gratifying to see how much has changed since the days of the Anglican Inclusion Wars when we were literally consumed by the efforts to punish those who affirm the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the Body of Christ by voting them off the Anglican Island. As Los Angeles Bishop John Taylor wrote:
In the year-long run-up to this summer’s gathering, planners have been cooing in our ears about fellowship and diligent study of 1 Peter, which Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby selected as our text. It would be, we were told, a time of gracious reconciliation and relationship-building.
All of which makes the sleight-of-hand move of inserting the Lambeth 1998 Resolution 1.10 anti-marriage equity language into the Lambeth Calls documents the gathered bishops will be called to affirm all the more egregious.

What can possibly be gained by reopening that battle which had — for the most part — been quelled in true Anglican fashion with an unarguable majority of provinces agreeing with Lambeth 1.10 and a significant minority disagreeing … and all coming to the table anyway?

To force a recapitulation of the portion of Lambeth 1.10 declaring "same gender marriage is not permissible" as "the mind of the Anglican Communion as a whole" pours kerosene on the embers of polarization and division -- turning the clock back rather than leading us forward into God's future.

It does nothing to serve the higher goals of unity around the common message of the Gospel and everything to once again cast LGBTQ people in the role of bargaining chips in a game of global Anglican politics.

The Gospel and the Communion deserve better. And so do God's beloved LBTQ people.

So here. I've fixed it:
Lambeth Call to Human Dignity

23. Prejudice on the basis of gender or sexuality threatens human dignity. Given Anglican polity, and especially the autonomy of Provinces, there is disagreement and a plurality of views on the relationship between human dignity and human sexuality. Yet, we experience the safeguarding of dignity in deepening dialogue. It is the mind of the Anglican Communion as a whole that same gender marriage is not permissible. Lambeth Resolution I.10 (1998) states that the “legitimizing or blessing of same sex unions” cannot be advised. It is the mind of the Communion to uphold “faithfulness in marriage between a man and a woman in lifelong union” (I.10, 1998).xxviii It is also the mind of the Communion that “all baptized, believing and faithful persons, regardless of sexual orientation are full members of the Body of Christ” and to be welcomed, cared for, and treated with respect (I.10, 1998).
You're welcome.

Best and warm,
The Reverend Canon Susan Russell
Canon for Engagement Across Difference
Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles

*Credit for "bait-and-switch Lambeth" goes to Bishop John H. Taylor in this FB post

Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Sitting for a minute as the dust settles from the 80th General Convention of the Episcopal Church

As the dust continues to settle from the 80th General Convention of the Episcopal Church, my FB feed is full of posts of friends and colleagues making their way home from Baltimore ... and reviews and summaries of the actions of GC80 are starting to pop up. This great ENS one from the always brilliant Mary Frances Schjonberg gives a very concise and helpful overview of major actions and challenges of what was truly an historic gathering.

This was the 11th Convention I've had the privilege of being part of -- this time from my "non-essential alternate" seat on my couch with my laptop. And so I also want to note -- with some bemused astonishment -- that among the resolutions that did not make the "above the line" commentary in the ENS overview because they were adopted overwhelmingly and engendered little if any debate or discussion were the ones posted below.

I need to sit with that realization for just a minute.

I need to work for a minute
to really absorb the fact that we have evolved 
from a church which was on the verge 
of being voted off the Anglican Island 
for daring to aspire to be a church 
where all the baptized were included in all the sacraments 
and where you could expect at every triennial meeting 
of the General Convention 
to get beat up with toxic theology 
and bad readings of Leviticus 
into a church where a staff position for LGBTQI & Women's Ministries, 
the creation of an LGBTQ+ Inclusion Task Force, 
expansion of our definition of gender identity and expression, 
and advocating for access to gender affirming care 
are among the resolutions adopted by wide consent.

As in with no debate.

As in ... OMG ... I really kind of need a minute.

More later. But for the moment lots of gratitude -- and lots of resolve to keep the work moving forward. La lucha continua.
  • A063 - That the 80th General Convention direct the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to establish a staff position of Director of LBGTQI and Women’s Ministries
  • D026 - That the 80th General Convention direct the Presiding Bishop and the President of the House of Deputies to appoint jointly a Task Force on LGBTQ+ Inclusion … who represent the diversity of the LGBTQ+ members of this Church
  • D029 – That the 80th Convention affirm that non-binary as well as binary identified transgender and cisgender people are included in the phrase "gender identity and expression,” and that the provisions of the Canons of the Episcopal Church apply equally to people of all genders.
  • D030 -- That the 80th General Convention of the Episcopal Church direct the Church Center to develop multilingual, multicultural churchwide resources to support our dioceses, provinces, churchwide leaders, and congregations in living into our commitments to welcome and support people and communities of diverse genders, including transgender and non-binary.
  • D045 -- That the 80th General Convention of the Episcopal Church express its full support of the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) and IOM (International Organization for Migration) in their mission to protect LGBTIQ+ persons forced to seek refugee or asylee status because they fear being persecuted based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and/or sex characteristics.
  • D066 -- That the 80th General Convention calls for the Episcopal Church to advocate for access to gender affirming care in all forms (social, medical, or any other) and at all ages as part of our Baptismal call to “respect the dignity of every human being.”
  • D072 -- That the 80th General Convention address the urgent need for gender and sexuality training in our church on all levels.
  • D092 -- That this 80th General Convention express to the Most Reverend and Right Honorable Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury, its dismay at the decision to exclude same-sex spouses of LGBTQ+ bishops from participating in Lambeth Conference 2022